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Health & Nursing Services

August 20th, 2015

Health & Nursing Services

Student Support Services is committed to removing barriers to learning and to promote the total well-being of students. The department provides wrap-around services, school psychology services, special education preschool, nursing, social services, and special education.

Michele Ferree
Director, Student Support Services
2801 Grant Line Rd.
New Albany, IN 47150
mferree@nafcs.k12.in.us
(812) 542-2168


Autism Team | Health Services | Physical Therapy Services | Section 504 | Social Work | Special Education |Occupational Therapy


AUTISM TEAM

he New Albany Floyd County Autism Team is a resource for parents and teachers of children with Autism Spectrum Disorder. The multidisciplinary team is mad up of New Albany Floyd County teachers, therapists, and psychologists who have experience and training in the area of Autism. The goal of New Albany Floyd County is to educate, facilitate, and empower parents and staff as they help children with ASD achieve their highest educational potential. For more information, please contact Cindy Berryman, New Albany Floyd County Autism Consultant at 812-542-2168 or by e-mail at cknight@nafcs.k12.in.us. For Additional Information: Christian Sarkine Autism Treatment Center http://www.iupui.edu/~psycdept/autism/ Indiana Resource Center on Autism http://www.iidc.indiana.edu/irca/fmain1.html


HEALTH & NURSING SERVICES

School Health Forms | Immunization Info | Illness Fact Sheets | Other Helpful Links

“Health Services” are programs and services that promote and protect the health, safety, and well being of students to assure a healthy environment that nurtures academic growth. These services are provided at the elementary and secondary levels. New Albany Floyd County School Corporation has 6 registered nurses on staff to coordinate health services.

Andrea Tanner, RN
Nursing Coordinator
atanner@nafcs.k12.in.us


PHYSICAL THERAPY SERVICES

Physical Therapy (PT) is a related service to be provided to students with disabilities. Related services are defined in Article 7 as services which are required in order for the student to benefit from special education. The appropriateness and extent of PT services must be directly related to the child’s ability to be successful in the recommended special education program. In other words, Physical Therapy services, if not provided, would prevent the student from participating in, or receiving benefit from the educational program. If the student has an identifiable therapy need that does not affect the student’s ability to learn and profit from the educational experience, that therapy is not the responsibility of the local educational agency.

The goal of therapy is to prepare the student to function independently in the areas where mastery is possible or to provide adaptations for the student who may require assistance in certain areas of performance.

The New Albany/Floyd County Consolidated School Corporation Physical Therapy Department currently consists of a Physical Therapist and a Physical Therapy Assistant. The current PT personnel has over 40 years combined experience working with children ages 3 – 21 years.

Physical Therapy is the acquisition and functional use of gross motor skills. Gross motor skills refer to the control and coordination of the large muscles of the body.

Applications to the Educational Process

    • Mobility – important for active participation in school activities and permits the student to experience incidental learning, to develop self-worth, and to assume appropriate age-level responsibilities.
    • Balance – necessary for safe sitting, safe walking, and freely changing positions. Problems in this area will result in difficulty standing in line, sitting within a group on the floor, walking down the hall, and negotiating stairs.
    • Range of motion – limited range of joint movement can lead to interference with functional use of arms or legs as required for sitting, reaching for objects, etc.
    • Muscle strength, muscle tone, endurance – limited strength and endurance may inhibit the student from keeping up with peers in PE, fatigue easily, may demonstrate a difference in a.m. vs. p.m. performance, or the ability to move books and school supplies. Muscle tone (too much or too little) can cause difficulty with head control, maintaining sitting balance at a desk, walking, running, or moving about the educational environment.
    • Adaptations – wedges, prone standers, corner sitters, etc. may be used to assist the student in more effective interaction with the school environment or aide the classroom staff in working with the student.

Service Delivery Model for Physical Therapy

The service delivery model is designed: 1) to help determine a student’s eligibility for the related services of PT in the educational setting; and 2) to help determine the intensity of services the student may require. It is based on the educational goals that indicate therapy and on the student’s need for and expected response to the intervention therapy. The guide to estimating the most appropriate level of service and the frequency of that intervention is based on the premise that: the NEED for therapy and the related GOALS help determine the type of delivery of service and the frequency of therapy.
The greater the student’s potential for improvement in physical and/or functional abilities, the greater the need for therapy to realize that potential. The potential for change is determined by many factors:

    • The student’s disability
    • Chronological age
    • Intellectual functioning
    • Attention span
    • Medical restrictions

Many students have a combination of needs that can be served by the therapy practitioner and the teacher working in a cooperative manner. In all cases, the therapist works with the teacher, other school personnel and parents to help the student learn and profit from the educational program.

What is Physical Therapy in the Educational Setting?

Physical therapists and physical therapy assistants are part of the special education team within a school district. Physical therapy evaluates and treats deficits in the acquisition and use of gross motor skills for students already receiving special education services. Gross motor skills refer to the control and coordination of the large muscles of the body. Physical therapy practitioners prepare the student to function independently in the areas where mastery is possible and provide adaptations for the student who may require assistance in certain areas of performance.

Physical Therapy (PT) is a related service to be provided to students with disabilities. Related services are defined in Article 7 as “services which are required in order for the student to benefit from special education.” The appropriateness and extent of PT services must be directly related to the student’s ability to be successful in the recommended special education program. In other words, PT services, if not provided, would prevent the student from participating in or receiving benefit from the educational program. If the student has an identifiable therapy need that does not affect the student’s ability to learn and profit from the educational experience, that therapy is not the responsibility of the local educational agency.

Service Delivery Model

The service delivery model is designed: 1) to help determine a student’s eligibility for the related services of Physical therapy in the educational setting; and 2) to help determine the intensity of services the student may require. It is based on the educational goals that indicate therapy and on the student’s need for and expected response to the intervention therapy. The guide to estimating the most appropriate level of service and the frequency of that intervention is based on the premise that: the NEED for therapy and the related GOALS help determine the type of delivery of service and the frequency of therapy.

The greater the student’s potential for improvement in physical and/or functional abilities, the greater the need for therapy to realize that potential. The potential for change is determined by many factors:

  • The student’s disability
  • Chronological age
  • Intellectual functioning
  • Attention span
  • Medical restrictions

Many students have a combination of needs that can be served by the therapy practitioner and the teacher working in a cooperative manner. In all cases, the therapist works with the teacher, other school personnel and parents to create a beneficial learning environment.

When to Refer

Students may be referred for a Physical therapy evaluation by teachers, parents, therapists, or other members of the case conference committee. Only a case conference committee can recommend a referral for related services, of which Physical therapy is one. The reason for referral may be a concern in one or more of the following areas that significantly impact the student’s performance in their educational program.

Applications to the Educational Process

  • Mobility – important for active participation in school activities and permits the student to experience incidental learning, to develop self-worth, and to assume appropriate age-level responsibilities. Mobility may include walking, gait trainers, assistive devices, and manual or motorized wheelchairs.
  • Balance – necessary for safe sitting, safe walking, and freely changing positions. Problems in this area will result in difficulty standing in line, sitting within a group on the floor, walking down the hall, and negotiating stairs.
  • Range of motion – limited range of joint movement can lead to interference with functional use of arms or legs as required for sitting, reaching for objects, etc.
  • Muscle strength/endurance – limited strength and endurance may inhibit the student from participating with peers during gross motor activities taking place in a school day. Problems in this area may cause the student to fatigue easily, a difference between am vs. pm performance, participate in PE class, and difficulty in the ability to move books and school supplies.
  • Muscle tone (too much or too little) – can cause difficulty with head control, maintaining sitting balance at a desk, walking, running, or moving about the educational environment.
  • Adaptations – wedges, prone standers, corner sitters, wheelchairs, adapted desks, etc. may be used to assist the student in more effective interaction with the school environment, aide the classroom staff in working with the student, assist the student with accessing and manipulating classroom tools.

SECTION 504 OF THE AMERICANS WITH DISABILITIES ACT

PARENTS/STUDENT RIGHTS IN IDENTIFICATION, EVALUATION AND PLACEMENT PURSUANT TO SECTION 504 OF THE REHABILITATION ACT

Please Keep This Explanation for Future Reference

The following is a description of the rights granted by this federal law to students with disabilities. The intent of the law is to keep you fully informed concerning decisions about your child and to inform you of your rights if you disagree with any of these decisions.

You have the right to:

  1. Have your child take part in, and receive benefits from public education programs without discrimination because of his/her disability.
  2. Have the school district advise you of your right under this federal law.
  3. Receive notice with respect to identification, evaluation, or placement of your valid.
  4. Have your child receive a free appropriate public education. This includes the right to be educated with non-disabled students to the maximum extent appropriate. It also includes the right to have the school district make reasonable accommodations to allow your child an equal opportunity to participate in school and school-related activities.
  5. Have your child educated in facilities and receive services comparable to those provided non-disabled students.
  6. Have your child receive special education and related services if s/he is found to be eligible under the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (PL 101-476) of Section 504 of the Rehabilitation Act:
  7. Have evaluation, educational, and placement decisions made based upon a variety of information sources, and by a group of persons, including persons who know the student, the evaluation data, and placement options.
  8. Have transportation provided to and from an alternative placement setting at no greater cost to you than would be incurred if the student were placed in a program operated by the district.
  9. Have your child be given an equal opportunity to participate in nonacademic and extracurricular activities offered by the district.
  10. Examine all relevant records relating to decisions regarding your child’s identification, evaluation, educational program, and placement.
  11. Obtain copies of your child’s educational records at a reasonable cost unless the fee would effectively deny you access to the records.
  12. Receive a response from the school district to reasonable requests for explanations and interpretations of your child’s records.
  13. Request amendment of your child’s educational records if there is reasonable cause to believe that they are inaccurate, misleading or otherwise in violation of the privacy rights of your child. If the school district refuses this request for amendment, it shall notify you within a reasonable time, and advise you of the right to hearing.
  14. Request mediation or an impartial due process hearing related to decisions or actions regarding your child’s identification, evaluation, educational program or placement. You and the student may take part in the hearing and have an attorney represent you. Hearing requests must be made to Section 504 Compliance Officer.
  15. File a local grievance.

The person in this district who is responsible for assuring that the district complies with Section 504.

Michele Ferree
Director of Student Support Services
2813 Grant Line Road
New Albany IN 47150
Telephone 812 542-2168


SOCIAL WORK

School Social Work is a vital part of the total educational team. Working in collaboration with school psychologists, school counselors, school nurses, teachers and administrators, The Wrap-around Coordinator and School Social Worker integrate the information from all of these sources to provide social, emotional, behavioral and adaptive functioning support to the child, the child’s family, and the school.

For more information contact:

Wrap-around Coordinator
Shannon Johnson
812-542-2168
sdjohnson@nafcs.k12.in.us


SPECIAL EDUCATION

Eligibility for Special Education Services
Students who are in need of special education services are first identified through a referral, assessment, and case conference process. This process, in accordance with Public Law 101-476 and Indiana Article 7, ensures that all children who qualify receive an individualized education program, are provided a free appropriate public education, and are educated in the least restrictive environment. Throughout the process, the rights and confidentiality of children and their families are protected.

Available Services

The New Albany-Floyd County Schools provide a full continuum of services to meet the needs of children who have disabilities.

Communication Handicapped (CH) Services are available in all of the New Albany-Floyd County schools for children who have speech or language disorders. Certified speech pathologists provide necessary therapeutic services and work closely with teachers, speech assistants, and parents to promote strong communication skills.

Learning Disable (LD) Students with learning disabilities receive services through building-based programs. All elementary and secondary schools in the county have programs that are designed to meet the needs of students with learning disabilities. Emphasis is placed on providing necessary accommodations to allow students to participate in general education classes. Resource rooms are available for students when it can e documented that additional support is necessary to provide appropriate educational services.

Emotionally Disturbed (ED) A range of program options are available for students who have emotional problems which interfere with educational progress. Resource support is available in the student’s Home School and two self-contained programs are available at Mt. Tabor School. At the secondary level, resource and self-contained programs are available at all middle and senior high schools. Certified teachers, instructional assistants, and an administrative team coordinate an educational approach to assist students to learn to deal with emotional adversity.

Mildly Mentally Handicapped (MIMH) Students receive services in their home school. The MIMH program promotes participation in regular classroom settings while providing necessary special education support. Resource programs are available at all middle and senior high schools. Emphasis is placed on allowing students to progress with classmates while building appropriate social skills, setting career goals, and receiving academic instruction on a level designed to promote academic and skill development.

Moderately Mentally Handicapped (MoMH) The primary and intermediate programs for moderately mentally handicapped students are located at Mt. Tabor & Georgetown Elementary Schools. The programs are uniquely designed to promote development in daily living skills, occupational readiness skills, social skills, and functional academics. Community based activities are built into the curriculum throughout the school year. Secondary level programs are located at Hazelwood Middle School, Highland Hills Middle School, Floyd Central High School and New Albany High School. Students are included in regular programming in accordance with goals and objectives identified in their individualized education programs. Community based activities continue to be an important part of the curriculum at all levels.

Severely Mentally Handicapped and Multiply Handicapped (MH) The primary and intermediate program for students with severe or multiple disabilities is located at Mt. Tabor School. The secondary level programs are located at Highland Hills Middle School and Floyd Central High School. Students in this program develop functional academic skills, daily living skill, pre-vocational skills, and appropriate social skills. Community-based instruction is part of the curriculum for this program. An Augmentative and assistive technology team assists in program development when necessary to facilitate communication skills and/or the use of assistive devices.

Hearing Impaired (HI) Elementary programming for students with hearing impairments is provided at Mt. Tabor School. Services include consultation and resource room services as well as full time services if needed. Scribner Middle School and New Albany High School are sites for secondary level hearing impaired programs. Services are provided by an itinerant teacher. Interpreter services are provided as needed.

Visually Impaired (VI) Students with visual impairments receive services in their home schools in the regular classroom setting. Special materials and devices such as large print books, enlarging equipment, and magnification devices are provided as needed. Services are provided by an itinerant teacher certified in the areas of visual impairments and mobility training.

Orthopedically Impaired (OI) Students with orthopedic/physical handicaps receive services in the regular classroom setting. Adaptive materials which may be needed to allow for participation in school activities are provided. When, necessary, transfer to a barrier free facility may be arranged. Services are monitored by an itinerant teacher certified in the area of orthopedic impairments.

Students who qualify for services in categories such as Traumatic Brain Injury, Deaf/Blind, Autism or Other Health Impaired are provided programming in accordance with the individualized education program designed by their respective case conference committee. Every effort is made to ensure that students receive appropriate services in the least restrictive environment.

Homebound/Hospital Programs Homebound/hospital programs provide instruction to children who are unable to attend school. For special education students, homebound/hospital instruction is initiated at the request of the case conference committee when necessary for medical reasons or after all other possibilities for keeping the student in school have been considered. Homebound/hospital instruction is also available for general education students who cannot attend school for medical reasons. Written authorization from a physician is required indicating that the child has an illness or injury which requires hospital or homebound instruction for a period of at least four weeks or whenever the student has a chronic illness or medical condition which requires periodic hospitalization or home care during the course of the school year.

Preschool/Early Intervention Program Early intervention is provided to 3, 4 or 5 year-old children who are eligible for services under Public Law 99-457. The New Albany-Floyd Country schools maintain several center based programs in various elementary schools. These self-contained programs have a capacity for eight special needs students with teacher and instructional assistant support. A collaborative program between the school system and Floyd County Headstart program is available for eligible four year old children. Preschool children who are able to attend local community preschool or day care centers are provided that opportunity. Support services are provided for these children to ensure that their community experiences are successful. Certified speech/language pathologists provide screening, evaluation, and therapeutic services for eligible students. In addition, parents are provided with instruction on working with their children to develop better communication and learning skills.

Transition Services Finding Opportunities and Rewards in Transitional Education (FORTE) is a secondary level transition program which assists special needs students with occupational and life choices as they prepare to transition into adult life. This program works closely with Indiana Vocational Rehabilitation Services and local community agencies and employers. In addition to on-the-job supported employment opportunities, the program offers classroom instruction on an elective basis in the area of occupational guidance and preparation skills.

Vocational Education Special Education students who meet eligibility requirements are afforded the opportunity to participate in the vocational/technical training programs offered at Prosser School of Technology.

Alternative Education Programs Special education students may also participate in one of several alternative education programs if the case conference committee feels that the student has the potential to be successful in an alternative educational environment.

Related Services

The New Albany-Floyd County Consolidated School Corporation provides related services as designated on a student’s individualized education program. “Related services means those services which are supplementary and complementary to the instructional program are required to assist a student to benefit from special education. Such services may be developmental, corrective, or supportive in nature and are generally provided by persons other than the teacher to whom the student is assigned.” (Indiana Article 7) The most common related services are occupational therapy, physical therapy and special transportation.

The school system has an Augmentative and Assistive Technology Team which will assess individual student needs, research available technology, and assist in writing appropriate educational plans for children who require augmentative or assistive devices in order to benefit from their educational program.

School Psychological Services provide assessment for students referred for educational evaluations. In addition, the school psychologists provide consultation services to parents, teachers and administrators and participate in case conference committee meetings.

The New Albany-Floyd County schools maintain a fleet of buses devoted to providing appropriate transportation services for students who need specialized transportation or whose program needs require that they be transferred to a school other than their home school. Specially equipped busses and vans are available for community based activities and field trips. Special transportation is also provided for students who attend Indiana School for the Blind or Indiana School for the Deaf in Indianapolis.


OCCUPATIONAL THERAPY

What is Occupational Therapy in the Educational Setting?

Occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants are part of the education team within a school district. The profession of occupational therapy is concerned with a person’s ability to participate in desired daily life activities or “occupations.” A child’s primary occupations are play and school. In the school setting, occupational therapists use their unique expertise to help children to be prepared for and perform important learning and school related activities and to fulfill their role as students. Occupational therapists work with children ages 3 to 21 who qualify for special education services as defined by Article 7.

Please refer to www.aota.org for more information about occupational therapy.

Occupational therapy is a related service. A student must be receiving special education services in order to be considered eligible for related services. Related services are services which are necessary in order to benefit a child in an educational setting. Related services must be directly related to the child’s ability to be successful in the recommended special education program. (511 IAC 7-3-44). The purpose of occupational therapy in the school setting is to support a child’s educational goals as defined by his/her Individualized Educational Plan.

Occupational therapists and occupational therapy assistants can provide services directly, integrated or on a consultation basis. Occupational therapists work collaboratively with teachers, paraprofessional staff and /or parents to facilitate a child’s performance in a particular need area.

Some of the areas addressed by OT

Fine Motor Skills (being able to appropriately use classroom tools using a variety of grasps/hand manipulation (e.g. scissors, pencils, paintbrushes, glue sticks, etc)
Visual-Motor Skills (copying prewriting shapes needed for letter formation, cutting skills, replicating block designs, doing mazes and puzzles, etc.)
Self-Help Skills (as it relates to the educational setting: may include, manipulation of fasteners, managing belongings, self-feeding skills, etc.)
Sensorimotor Abilities (Student’s ability to process sensory information. Difficulties with sensory processing must impact a student’s ability to function in the educational setting.)
Sensory areas may include: tactile (touch), proprioceptive (received from joints and muscles and provides the body with information regarding where the body is in space and where body parts are in relation to one another), vestibular (movement), auditory, oral and visual.

When to Refer

Students may be referred for an Occupational therapy evaluation by teachers, parents, therapists, or other members of the case conference committee. The reason for referral may be a concern in one or more of the following areas that significantly impact their performance in their specific education program.

Areas may include: Fine motor skills, visual motor skills, self care, or sensory processing abilities.

If the student is only having minor difficulties in one area or only needs adaptations, a screening or observation may be requested prior to the referral for evaluation to determine whether a full evaluation is necessary.
Please refer to the Teacher Tips (under the Occupational Therapy heading under Staff) for suggestions to try for children experiencing difficulty with any of the above areas before requesting an Occupational therapy evaluation.

Websites for Parents

www.sensory-processing-disorder.com

www.aota.org

http://bt021.k12.sd.us/Default.htm

http://www.ccs.k12.in.us/hbm/occupational_therapy.htm

http://home.earthlink.net/~lmlk/